The Lay of Belruel

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A few decades after the defeat of Aggennon, a motion was passed among the Grey Council to canonize Belruel Aldaelon, out of respect for her sacrifice. The bard Jerie Holkyns, one of the more popular bards in Everhall, spent the next month writing a new song, titled “The Lay of Belruel”. It described Belruel herself, and told her story. The song was well received among the common folk of the day.

Today, the song is still sung in the closing hours of Everfair, the holiday surrounding Belruel’s death and the defeat of Aggennon, though it has lost its craze-level popularity since its creation.

New archaeological digs focusing on Belruel’s time period have uprooted some new contrary evidence, which has given some critics the idea that Holkyns’ song is more fiction than fact. Still, the basis for the song is rooted in truth, and it is doubted that any new information will be sufficient enough to change over nine hundred years’ worth of tradition.

The lyrics of “The Lay of Belruel”:

“’Twas the twelving day of Everfair

When fell my maid of raven hair,

Beneath her cloven standard of the wren.

And damn that roiling goblin horde.

We’d almost slain the overlord; but I could never roll an elf again.

“The Queen of Bells and Battle-Downs”

She wore the title like a crown.

Foes so deep a man would drown, but she still stood alone.

A princess and a duchess both,

And sworn to nine prestigious oaths,

These duties, they would take her to that twisting spire of stone.

Against his tower, a silhouette;

She called out like a coronet

And the green sea of his armies burst from warrens far below.

The pacts he’d made with demonkind

Had rent his thin and tattered mind,

And hellish princedoms occupied the arrow he let go.

They took her through the crowded square

And laid her at the temple stair;

The sorcelled barb of Aruidair beyond their healing arts.

There stands a circlet on her brow

That turns the blades of men around,

But if Belruel could hear me now this song would pierce her heart.

‘Twas the twelving day of Everfair

When fell my maid of raven hair,

Beneath her cloven standard of the wren.

And damn that roiling goblin horde!

And damn their hell-bound overlord! But I could never roll an elf again.”

It is unknown what Holkyns meant when he writes “but I could never roll an elf again.” Holkyns himself never mentioned it during his lifetime, and left no writings about the writing process for historians to peruse.

The Lay of Belruel

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